Exhibitions

We begin programming in The Legacy Gallery with an exhibition organized by The Studio Museum in Harlem entitled People, Places, and Things: Selections from The Studio Museum. Exploring artworks created from the 1930's to 1980s, this show features everything from portraits to landscapes by a group of renowned artists who depicted everyday life in communities throughout the U.S., including Harlem.

Detail from Type City by: Hong Seon Jang

Detail from Type City by: Hong Seon Jang

Our exhibition in The Salon, entitled Txt: art, language, media, investigates new forms of literacy and the visual impact of this on everyday life, from the literature of ABCs and spoken word poetry to text messaging and emojis. Featured artists include Josefina Baez, Karlos Carcamo, Vidal Centeno, Andrew Demirjian, Dahlia Elsayed, Leor Grady, Hong Seon Jang, Swati Khirana, Iviva Olenick, Antonia Perez, and Kenny Rivero. Presented with El Museo del Barrio, Txt is co-curated by Rocio Aranda-Alvarado from El Museo and Lauren Kelley from Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art & Storytelling.

Photo Credit: Michael J. Palma

Photo Credit: Michael J. Palma

The Pollen Catchers' Color Mixing Machine, a site-specific mural created by Saya Woolfalk, opens The Main Gallery of The Living Room.  Inspired by a collaboration with her young daughter, Aya Woolfalk Mitchell, the commissioned project fills six gallery walls with a mysterious and enthralling pictorial narrative inspired by fables and folk tales, and the symbols they engender.

We will host a culminating exhibit for the Museum’s Artist-in-Residence in The Studio, a work space specifically designed for this program.  The 2015 Artist in Residence, David Shrobe, is a fourth generation Harlem resident, current Joan Mitchell Teaching Fellow, and Hunter College graduate, whose paintings, wall installations and objects are deeply influenced by the community’s visual environment.

 

I think art can make people conscious of things. For people who have prejudices, it can make them see in another way, make them realize that other people in other cultures have similar experiences.
— Elizabeth Catlett